Meditation Au Naturel With Siddhartha Gautama

Skyclad, with no physical barrier to call attention to the body, the holy man travels inward, banishing shadows and confusion.

Skyclad, with no physical barrier to call attention to the body, the holy man travels inward, banishing shadows and confusion.

I am busy writing a novel as a NaNoWriMo challenge to myself. The story has been brewing for some time as though having taken a life of its own. My task is simply to allow the words out from the depths and make sure I don’t mess up the story with too many grammatical errors. The story is about some fictitious male around my age with my life experience, who goes on a pilgrimage along the Camino de Santiago.

In the story, the main character meets and interacts with a number of historical figures who, curiously, have no issue with the natural human body. One of these historical figures is the young Siddhartha Gautama, before he became Buddha. For six years, Siddhartha lived like all Sadhu holy men, without clothing, in search of enlightenment. Many early images of this man, as Buddha, show him with little or no clothing. It is with this image in mind that I have Sid [Siddhartha] play his role. Below you can see one of the scenes from the book that is in progress.

– – – * – – –

He still had just over four kilometres to travel before he reached the high point of the day’s travel at Col de Lepoeder.

Rainy was about halfway to the peak when he decided to stop for another break. After taking of his boots and socks, he dug out an apple, some cheese and a petit pain he had bought in Saint Jean. His water supply was good as he had refilled it while at Roland’s fountain just a short while earlier. Just as he was about to bite into his apple, he heard some excitement from other pilgrims on the trail just a bit further up the trail. Curious, he stood up, picked up his boots and walked about seventy-five metres where he saw five pilgrims in various stages of what could best be described as shock, exhilaration and even anger. Seeing him, one woman pointed to a rock about 100 metres away upon which a naked man was obviously engaged in meditation.

“It’s disgusting!” the woman ranted. “This isn’t the third world, this is a Christian world. That pervert should be arrested!”

Rainy looked critically at the outline of the man. It was obvious that he was naked, but it was impossible to see his genitals as he was faced away from the trail. Really, it was hard to see why the woman had taken offense. Sure he was naked, but not in a way that suggested he was trying to flaunt himself to all passersby. As he turned back to try and calm the woman, he caught her taking photos of the nude man with her smartphone.

“Do you think that’s appropriate?” Rainy questioned the woman who voice was almost screeching with indignation. “You can’t really see anything anyway.”

“But, it’s against the law! He should be in jail,” she protested. “What if some children saw him? They would be psychologically scarred. I’m going to show these photos to the police and get justice done.”

“Relax, lady,” Rainy interrupted. “He’s meditating, can’t you see that? Besides, there are no children here. Hell, even you can’t see his privates. Put your camera away. If anything, you are breaking the law taking photos of someone without permission. For sure if you put that photo on the Internet, you would be breaking the law. Why don’t you just continue on to Roncevalles? I will take care of this.”

With that said, Rainy walked across the barren hillside to reach the man who was meditating. As Rainy got closer, he realised that the man was Sid. ‘Where was Akka?’ was the first thought that went through his mind. Closing the distance, Rainy was taken by surprise when Sid spoke up without opening his eyes.

“I’ve been waiting for you, Rainy. It’s a beautiful afternoon. Won’t you join me for some meditation?”

About A Naturist's Lens

I am a therapist that focuses on the use of active imagination, photograph, dreamwork and Jungian Psychology in order to uncover the whole person hidden beneath layers of personae, complexes and clothing.

Posted on November 6, 2014, in Jungian Psychology. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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