Naked and Vulnerable

My workplace bathed in sunshine.

My workplace bathed in sunshine.

A sunny day and very windy with cool temperatures is the gift that nature has given me this morning as I sit here in front of my laptop in my office. The rays of the sun are coming through the window warming my back as I write this post. This moment won’t last too long as the sun shifts from east to west.

In another corner of the room I have my cushion in place for my morning meditation. I guess I could best describe this room, not as an office, but as a sanctuary where I can “just sit” or write furiously when the demands of my inner voices fill me with the urge to write.

Speaking of urges to write, I have decided to attempt writing a novel during the month of November. As I was reading Ed Raby Sr.’s blog post about writing as therapy, I noticed that was going to be taking on this challenge. I then realised that I had promised myself, many years ago, to write a novel. Perhaps I am now old enough to make this attempt and have a novel worth reading. I don’t yet know what I will write about, but I am not worried about it.

My focus for the moment is to finish my Poetic Naturist book. I am having a trusted colleague read the poems with a critical eye while I struggle with gathering the photos for this collection of poetry. Why images? Well, it is just how it is with me. When it comes to depth, to soul, to the spirit I find a compulsion to bring in images in order to access the depths. It is as though images open doors that take me out of the mundane world and into an rich, fertile, inner world.

Now that I am talking about images, I want to talk about images and naturism. I want to preface my thoughts here with the caveat that I am talking about nudity and images from a point of having the images point to something deeper than the exposed skin. Like writing, this leads to a therapeutic depth as it serves as a liminal portal, a doorway through which we can break down, uncover and expose those aspects that limit out growth. The image then becomes more than simply a recording of a person’s state of undress.

Images that take us into soul, into depth.

Images that take us into soul, into depth.

Is it necessary to have images of nudity to accomplish this need for depth? Obviously I think so. And, I have to say that I have a lot of good company with this thinking. One of the images that achieves this aspect of being more than an image of nudity, is that of Adam reaching out to touch a finger of God. Rather than being a pornographic image, Michelangelo’s image was captured forever on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, the seat of Christianity of the past and the seat of Catholicism in the present. Full frontal nudity is here, holy. It is total honesty and totally human. There is no sense of sin, of evil, of darkness.

Psychologically, this is what many experience, unconsciously, when the discover the exhilarating freedom of  naturism. And, this is an engagement in depth that connects body with soul. Healing then becomes and act of rediscovering the wholeness of being human, and the holiness of our creation – naked and vulnerable.

 

4 thoughts on “Naked and Vulnerable

  1. This really resonated with me. For some, apparently not as many as I would have thought, being deprived of this simple pleasure due to life’s relentless demands is a soul-sapping hunger.

    I recall speaking with a friend who was recently divorced and living in her house but needed to take in a boarder to keep up the payments. My wife and I were talking with her when she dropped by to visit and we were, of course, positive that she had found an acceptable boarder and how it would help keep her in her home. She replied with a weary, “yes”. We were somewhat taken aback and asked whether there was a problem. She admitted that she had been in the habit of making Sunday here nude day where she would be alone in her house and just spend the whole day naked because she just felt the need to engage in what for her was a special pleasure. We were not shocked, but a little surprised and pleased that she was comfortable opening up to us like that. Although she knew we were sympathetic and amateur enthusiasts so we may have been her only understanding sounding board to express her sense of loss.

    However, the sadness, resignation, hunger and sense of emptiness she conveyed was unsettling. To this day she has found no resolution and it seems to sap the energy from the rest of her life. I’m beginning to think there may be some genetic “mutation” at work that creates such desire for what so many that I come across don’t quite comprehend.

    The generally negative view of such “deviance” does not make for a supportive environment. Maybe proof of a genetic mutation would garner more sympathy, even human rights protections!

    Cheers

    • A moving story, Bill. It is this real sense of sadness that is often unvoiced and unconscious that permeates much of our modern world. We unconsciously respond with addictions and attention deficits. And when we know, then we feel the ache of loss for what we know would soothe our body and soul. Thank you for responding with deep thoughts and care.

  2. Robert . Don’t want to be critical , but Michealangelo painted the Sistine chapel . Rembrant came later – Dutch – and I don’t he he painted any nudes ?

    Thanks for sharing the picture of your space .

    I’ve been reading , The second half of Life , and really think it’s great . Lots to think about .

    Yesterday I played water volleyball and pentague at a local club with some new friends I’ve met .

    • LOL! What a blooper! I knew this but somehow my brain shut off. I even spelled “Sistine” chapel wrong. Thanks for bring the “Rembrandt” issue to my attention. 🙂 Good to hear you are enjoying life and a good book.

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