Going Natural and Healing The Soul

Past issue of Going Natural - FCN magazine

Past issue of Going Natural – FCN magazine

I just received the latest issue of Going Natural – Au Naturel, the publication of the Federation of Canadian Naturists (FCN). I have to admit that it is one of the best issues yet. As I perused it, I realised that I haven’t been writing for a while on my book project. Holidays and visiting demand presence and that presence has to be real which means that focus on the book has to be released in order to give proper and due focus to family. I imagine that with the end of active interaction with grandchildren over this next week, I will be able to take a step back from engagement in the outer world to once again immerse myself in writing.

For those who wonder what kind of book I am writing, it has as its subject the use of naturism and meditation as therapy that is depth-psychology focused. For many people, the soul has become so battered that it seems to have been forever lost, or broken beyond repair. As a result, most are hiding what little remains of their sacred and scared inner self behind layer after layer of disguise and camouflage. The problem is that with this strategy of self-protection, we get lost, losing sight of that centre of self behind the camouflage. That is when we begin to believe we have lost our soul. I, like so many others, found myself in this situation and it has only been through the blending of naturism, Buddhist meditation, and focused work using depth psychology strategies that I have rediscovered that central core of my being. My hope is to capture this process in a way that can be shared with others, perhaps then providing a path of hope to others who have found themselves hurting and hopeless.

About A Naturist's Lens

I am a therapist that focuses on the use of active imagination, photograph, dreamwork and Jungian Psychology in order to uncover the whole person hidden beneath layers of personae, complexes and clothing.

Posted on August 5, 2013, in Buddhism, Jungian Psychology and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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